• Proposed
  • Under Assessment
  • Preliminary Assessed
  • Assessed
  • VUPublished

Trametopsis brasiliensis (Ryvarden & de Meijer) Gómez-Mont. & Robledo

Search for another species...

Scientific name
Trametopsis brasiliensis
Author
(Ryvarden & de Meijer) Gómez-Mont. & Robledo
Common names
 
IUCN Specialist Group
Mushroom, Bracket and Puffball
Kingdom
Fungi
Phylum
Basidiomycota
Class
Agaricomycetes
Order
Polyporales
Family
Irpicaceae
Assessment status
Published
Assessment date
2021-10-18
IUCN Red List Category
VU
IUCN Red List Criteria
C2a(ii)
Assessors
Westphalen, M., Martins da Cunha, K., Costa-Rezende, D.H., Calaça, F., Alves-Silva, G. & Drechsler-Santos, E.R.
Reviewers
Mueller, G.M.

Assessment Notes

The content on this page is fetched from The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species: https://www.iucnredlist.org/species/209595252/209597363

Justification

Trametopsis brasiliensis basidiomes are known only from two collections made in 1992 and 1999. The specimens are from two localities in high altitude environments of the Brazilian southern Atlantic Forest domain. Both sites are in the mixed ombrophilous forest (above 900 m a.s.l.) in Paraná State. It is likely a rare species, as areas of mixed ombrophilous forest are among the most surveyed of the Atlantic Forest in southern Brazil, where in ca. 15 years of intensive sampling no specimens have been found. The total number of mature individuals is estimated to be no more than 3,000, restricted to one subpopulation. The population is suspected to decline by at least 24% over the next 20 years, driven by continued loss and degradation of the habitat due to human activity and climate change. The species is assessed as Vulnerable under the criterion C2a(ii).

Taxonomic notes

Trametopsis brasiliensis was described in 2002 in the genus Antrodiella (Ryvarden and de Meijer 2002) and later transferred to Trametospis based on molecular and morphological data (Gomez-Montoya et al. 2017). Its phylogenetic placement was first studied by Miettinen et al. (2012) when the type specimen was sequenced.

Geographic range

Currently, Trametopsis brasiliensis basidiomes are known only from two localities in high altitude environments in the southern Atlantic Forest domain of Brazil, both in Araucaria forests (above 900 m alt.) in Paraná State. These two sites are separated by only about 30 km. The species is expected to occur throughout Araucaria forests in southern Brazil, and possibly extended to some other montane environments in the Atlantic Forest.

Population and Trends

The species was first collected in 1992 and later in 1999, with both collections from Paraná State, Brazil, in the Araucaria forest. In the period of 10 years between the first collection and the species' description, these were the only specimens found, and remain to this day as the only collections known of the species. Therefore, this is a rare species, as Araucaria forests are among the most surveyed in southern Brazil, such as the São Joaquim National Park and the São Francisco de Paula National Park, where in almost 20 years of intensive sampling no specimens have been found. Based on the extent of potential appropriate habitat, the species could occur in up to 500 additional sites, each supporting 3-6 mature individuals resulting in an estimate of no more than 3,000 mature individuals; restricted to one subpopulation. The population is predicted to decline by at least 24% over the next 20 years, due to continued loss and degradation of the required habitat due to human activity and impact of climate change (Tagliari et al. 2021). The population decline was estimated in light of extensive loss of suitable habitat (Castro et al. 2020) and the putative influence that habitat degradation has on species occupation in a given environment (Berglund and Jonsson 2003, Haddad et al. 2015).

Population Trend: decreasing


Habitat and Ecology

Trametopsis brasiliensis is saprobic and lignicolous, causing a white-rot. The specimens from southern Brazil were described as found on branches of dicotyledonous trees, but no information on the host species was provided. It is known only from montane environments in Araucaria forests (mixed ombrophilous forest).

Threats

The species is known from two localities about 30km from each other, in Araucaria forests in the Atlantic Forest domain. The deforestation rate of the Atlantic Forest largely declined in the last two decades. However, it was the most exploited ecosystem, and only 28% of its natural coverage remains, largely composed of small forest fragments and secondary forests (Tabarelli et al. 2010, Rezende et al. 2018). The two specimens known were found in Araucaria forests (mixed ombrophilous forest), which are characterized by the presence of the species Araucaria angustifolia, which is assessed as CR on the IUCN Red List (Thomas 2013). These forests are restricted to regions with subtropical climate in southern/south-eastern Brazil, as well as north-eastern Argentina and parts of Paraguay. However, they have lost about 97% of the original cover in the last 100 years, mainly due to logging, a decline that is still ongoing, and currently are mostly found in southern Brazil. Additionally, only a small part of the Araucaria forests are in conservation areas, and studies suggest that, due to climate change, by 2070 they could be restricted to highland microrefugia, of which only 2.5% are in conservation areas (Castro et al. 2020, Tagliari et al. 2021).

Conservation Actions

Each of the known localities are in Conservation Areas, but the species also likely occurs in non-protected areas. The main conservation action required is the continuity and enhancement of protection within Conservation Areas and implementation of habitat protection and management at other sites inside the Atlantic Forest in an attempt to protect the remaining habitat fragments of the domain.

Trametopsis brasiliensis has been extensively studied by several authors (Miettinen et al. 2012, Gomez-Montoya et al. 2017, Westphalen et al. 2019). However, more surveys are needed in other areas with Araucaria forest as well as montane dense ombrophilous forests to confirm the species’ range and ecology, since its occurrence may be more restricted than the estimate. In addition, culture studies to better understand the species' biology would also be important, especially considering Trametopsis is a small genus with only three species confirmed.

Use and Trade

There is no known use of this species.

Source and Citation

Westphalen, M., Martins da Cunha, K., Costa-Rezende, D.H., Calaça, F., Alves-Silva, G. & Drechsler-Santos, E.R. 2022. Trametopsis brasiliensis. The IUCN Red List of Threatened Species 2022: e.T209595252A209597363. https://dx.doi.org/10.2305/IUCN.UK.2022-1.RLTS.T209595252A209597363.en .Accessed on 31 July 2023

Country occurrence