• Proposed
  • 2Under Assessment
  • 3Preliminary Assessed
  • 4Assessed
  • 5Published

Ahtiana aurescens (Tuck.) A. Thell & Randlane

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Scientific name
Ahtiana aurescens
Author
(Tuck.) A. Thell & Randlane
Common names
 
IUCN Specialist Group
Lichens
Kingdom
Fungi
Phylum
Ascomycota
Class
Lecanoromycetes
Order
Lecanorales
Family
Parmeliaceae
Assessment status
Proposed
Proposed by
James Lendemer
Assessors
James Lendemer, Colby Sain

Assessment Notes

Taxonomic notes

Originally described as Cetraria aurescens more than a century and a half ago. Although the species has been transferred to multiple general since its description, it has consistently been recognized as distinct. It has generally been treated in the genus Ahtiana for more than twenty years, and earlier names used in the literature include Platysma aurescens and Tuckermannopsis aurescens. Some recent authors also treat it as Nephromopsis aurescens.


Why suggested for a Global Red List Assessment?


Geographic range

This species can be seen within its distribution which is across the East-Temperate United States, in the Appalachian-Great Lakes region to be more specific.


Population and Trends

Historical AOO was 744.000km2
1990-2024 AOO is 340.000km2

A 404.000km2 decrease in AOO

Population Trend: Decreasing


Habitat and Ecology

This species grows on conifer bark or wood, often of Northern White Cedar (Thuja occidentalis), American hemlock (Tsuga canadensis) and a variety of pines (Pinus). Fence rails made from conifers have been recorded historically as a substrate for Ahtiana aurescens. The species prefers high-light habitats with frequent periods of high humidity and is associated with canopy branches in forest strands and more generally with bark and branches of trees in bogs and other swampy environments. It is recognized an indicator of mature and old-growth forest habitats.

Temperate ForestBogs, Marshes, Swamps, Fens, Peatlands [generally over 8 ha]

Threats


Conservation Actions

No conservation actions currently implemented

Site/area protectionResource & habitat protectionNational level

Research needed

Research on mode of decline for this species in addition to potential commercial uses as well as taxonomic and life history evaluations

TaxonomyLife history & ecologyHarvest, use & livelihoodsThreatsActionsPopulation trends

Use and Trade

Unknown at this time

Unknown

Bibliography


Country occurrence

Regional Population and Trends

Country Trend Redlisted