• Proposed
  • Under Assessment
  • 3Preliminary Assessed
  • 4Assessed
  • 5Published

Perplexostereum endocrocinum (Berk.) Ryvarden & Tutka

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Scientific name
Perplexostereum endocrocinum
Author
(Berk.) Ryvarden & Tutka
Common names
 
IUCN Specialist Group
Mushroom, Bracket and Puffball
Kingdom
Fungi
Phylum
Basidiomycota
Class
Agaricomycetes
Order
Russulales
Family
Incertae sedis
Assessment status
Under Assessment
Proposed by
Catia Canteiro
Assessors
Susana P. Cunha, Susana C. Gonçalves
Comments etc.
Catia Canteiro

Assessment Notes

Unsure between DD and LC.
Authors of Liu et al., 2017 were contacted for more information on locations in China, but haven’t replied.

Justification

Perplexostereum endocrocinum is a polypore known from Nepal, Bengal and South-western China, where it is reported to be common. Nevertheless, there are few recorded observations (around 4) and the number of sites for China is not specified. Moreover, two observations, in Nepal and Bengal, were recorded before 1931 and may no longer harbor mature populations. Population decline due to habitat loss is also difficult to estimate since there are multiple possible hosts. Without more information on known sites, or targeted search efforts in areas of potential habitat it is difficult to estimate population size, so the species is assessed as Data Deficient (DD).

OR

Perplexostereum endocrocinum is a polypore known from Nepal, Bengal and South-western China, where it is reported to be common. Population size is projected to be above 20000 individuals and though habitat loss may present a threat to this species, population decline is difficult to estimate since there are multiple possible hosts. Therefore, the species is assessed as Least Concern (LC).


Taxonomic notes

Originally described as Stereum endocrocinum. Perplexostereum endocrocinum is the only species in the monotypic genus Perplexostereum, created in 2014 due to its distinct morphological characteristics (Ryvarden and Tutka, 2014). It has since been confirmed as a distinct clade within Russulales using molecular data (Liu et al., 2017) but its familial position is still unclear.


Why suggested for a Global Red List Assessment?


Geographic range

The species is generally mentioned exclusively for Nepal, where it has been documented in Yangma valley and the Kanchenjunga National Park (Ryvarden and Tutka, 2014), and more recently for South-western China (Liu et al., 2017). However, there is also one record of the species in Behala, Bengal from 1931 (Banerjee, 1935).


Population and Trends

P. endocrocinum has been documented for two sites in Nepal (in 1850 and 2012), in one site in Bengal (1931) and in China. It is unclear whether all these sites still exist or correspond to mature populations, but the species is presumed to have a wide distribution at high-altitudes in South-western China (Liu et al., 2017). Following Dahlberg and Mueller (2011) guidelines, population size is projected to be above 20000 individuals.
Global Forest Watch (2023) does not report a significant deforestation in the area, but some Abies sp. and Juniperus sp. forests in China have been assigned threatened categories in the Red list of China’s forest ecosystems (Chen et al. 2020). Still, given that there are multiple possible hosts it is difficult to estimate a decline in population due to habitat loss.

Population Trend: Uncertain


Habitat and Ecology

P. endocrocinum grows on dead coniferous wood at high altitudes, namely with Cupressaceae in China. So far it has been found on Juniperus sp. and possibly Abies sp.. (Ryvarden and Tutka, 2014 and Liu et al., 2017)

Temperate Forest

Threats

Some Abies sp. and Juniperus sp. forests in China were classified as threatened in Red list of China’s forest ecosystems (Chen et al. 2020), which could present a threat to this species.

Housing & urban areas

Conservation Actions

Protection of appropriate habitat, namely Abies sp. and Juniperus sp. forests, is needed to ensure protection of the P. endocrocinum.

Site/area protectionResource & habitat protection

Research needed

Search efforts in the regions where the species was found in the past and in areas of suitable habitat are needed to confirm the current population size and distribution of the species.

TaxonomyPopulation size, distribution & trendsLife history & ecologyThreats

Use and Trade


Bibliography


Country occurrence

Regional Population and Trends

Country Trend Redlisted